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Sony’s Yoshida on the Vita and the cloud

Sony Worldwide Studios boss, Shuhei Yoshida has said in a new interview that Sony is still working to find out the true potential of the PS Vita, including showing third parties how they’ll be able to utilise the device to best work with PS3.

Speaking to Develop, Yoshida said that, in his mind, “we are still at the starting phase of realising and showing the potential of PS Vita,” adding that “PS Mobile is a larger initiative that also includes Vita.”

“Bearing in mind it’s been only four months since we launched PS Vita, I’m very happy with how the Vita has come out,” Yoshida said to the site.

“We’ve worked really closely with the hardware group over the last few years to discuss what devices and capabilities would make sense.

“We wanted to create the idea of a portable gaming system with our hardware group that we also wanted as a game development group. Four months later, we’re still working hard to realise the potential and vision that our hardware team has created with PS Vita.”

One example Yoshida gives of this potential is the announcement of PS1 classic support with the next firmware update. Other examples are how Sony use PS3 and PS Vita together.

Yoshida also went on to give his hopes and expectation for the new PS Mobile SDK that allows small independent developers to develop games that work on PS certified Android devices as well as on PS Vita.

“I’m hearing lots of small independent developers say they’re interested in using PS Mobile to create small games to release on PS Vita,” he said.

“In the past, becoming a certified, licensed developer for the Playstation platform was not an easy thing to do. The development kit was somewhat expensive.

“With PS Mobile, people can just download the SDK from our web site and when they decide to publish their game, they can pay us just $99 per year to become the publisher of their content, so that includes PS Vita.

“It all comes from our understanding and appreciation of the widening availability of gaming opportunities for consumers across different devices. We’d like to reach out to these new people who have discovered gaming for the first time on their smartphones and tablets.”

“I can’t wait to see what kind of games and content will come out via PS Mobile because there are many more people on the system,” Yoshida concluded.

Elsewhere in the interview, the Sony boss also took time to talk about cloud gaming and how the company does consider it something for the future, once the proper infrastructures are in place.

“I think those avenues are valid and it’s definitely a good idea to make use of cloud gaming technologies. We’ve been looking at the variety of technologies we could include in the Playstation ecosystem,” notes Yoshida.

“We looked at different motion sensing tech and our vision analysis technologies to create PS Move for example

“We’ve been looking at streaming tech as well, and one of the examples we had was what we call remote play. Remote Play was where you connect your PSP through the internet to your PS3. It is like a cloud gaming service at a fundamental level in terms of how the mechanic itself works.

“Cloud gaming services allow us to stream games via a server to different devices, but in order for it to become practical, the internet has to be very robust in terms of bandwidth and latency.

“As with all things infrastructure, it takes time for it to become widely available. Some consumers in the US and some parts of Europe have very robust and fast net speeds, so cloud gaming would be practical in those markets, but not when you look at the wider, broader global market.

“Cloud gaming, because it’s so easy for consumers and is so convenient (ie you don’t have to do any big downloads, installation or setup). When there are faster internet connections, gaming in the cloud as a subscription service could become a reality.

“We’re looking at what OnLive is doing and the tech around that, and considering how this can be a part of Playstation,” Yoshida concludes.

Edited On 21 Jun, 2012

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